Nigel Farage uses a far-right conspiracy theory on homophobic and Islamophobic TV channel

  • During an interview on Revelation TV this year Farage said he has been one of the “most hardline voices” against immigration and echoes far-right arguments, claiming that migration across the Mediterranean will “imperil the future of our civilization”. 
  • During the interview Farage also endorsed the ‘New World Order” and “one world government” conspiracy theories.
  • In 2004 Revelation TV was criticised by Ofcom for homophobia, and in 2018 the channel was fined €6000 by by a Spanish court for airing content that “threatened the dignity of homosexual and transgender people”. 
  • In 2008 the channel was reprimanded by Ofcom for not exercising the proper degree of responsibility in relation to the airing of Islamophobic content. 

Despite Nigel Farage’s long history of dangerous and divisive statements, it was nevertheless surprising to find that he had given a long interview to the evangelical channel Revelation TV in February of this year. By the time Farage appeared on the channel it had already been reprimanded by Ofcom for both homophobia and Islamophobia

In an apparently unguarded moment, he expressed some bizarre and extreme views that are a far cry from the more sanitised performances that he has given since joining the Brexit Party. While he has long talked about immigration and promoted the widely criticised ‘Breaking Point’ poster during the Referendum campaign, he went further in this interview:

I’ve been one of the most hardline voices for the last four or five years saying we’ve got to stop the flow [of migrants] across the Mediterranean and if we allow it to continue we will actually […] imperil the future of our civilization.

The Brexit Party has, until recently, shied away from the immigration debate, perhaps attempting to avoid being tarnished with the toxic legacy of UKIP on that topic. Yet in this interview, Farage is proud to describe himself as a ‘hardliner’ and to promulgate the poisonous fallacy that European civilisation itself is under threat from migration, which is a rallying cry of far-right groups across the world. He also admits that the root of his hostility to migration is a belief in the incompatibility of different religions and cultures, rather than economic or practical concerns:

There are different communities from different parts of the world, with different religions and for those religions to coexist peacefully doesn’t always happen overnight […] I think if you look at what’s happened in cities in Sweden, in cities in Germany, you realise there’s actually a huge rift in society, with completely different cultural values towards the role of women in society or whatever else.

But it was only a matter of time before Farage led the Brexit Party Ltd towards nasty, dog-whistle rhetoric around immigration – it has long been a key plank of his politics, something that appeals to the extreme figures who have taken key positions in the party.

The Brexit Party’s former candidate for Stoke North, Daniel Rudd, was dismissed for a number of hateful posts about migrants, calling them “gimme-grunts” who “take what they can”. Andrew Garcarz, the Brexit Party candidate for Birmingham Ladywood and county organiser for Staffordshire, was revealed in August for having endorsed the “Coudenhove-Kalergi plan” myth, a variant on the racist “White Genocide” conspiracy theory. He also described European migrants as “Penniless, ill-educated thieves and opportunists […] worthless parasites, crooks and criminals”.

Before attempting to rebrand himself, Farage himself frequently used alarmist and discriminatory language about immigration. He told LBC that he would be “concerned” at the idea of living next door to Romanian people – but not German people, for reasons he did not explain. When asked which kind of immigrants he would like to come to the UK, he replied “people who don’t have HIV”. And he has a life-long admiration of Enoch Powell, infamous for his “Rivers of Blood” speech, sections of which Farage has recited from memory.

New World Order’ Conspiracy Theory

During his Revelation TV interview, Farage also makes some statements that flirt with conspiracy theories about an impending World Government, even using the common antisemitic dog-whistle phrase “New World Order” and citing the two most prominent Jewish-founded banks to illustrate his point: 

These firms like Goldman Sachs & JP Morgan who actually see the European Union as basically the forerunner of global government […] it’s pretty clear who the enemy is as far as I’m concerned – the enemy are these giant multinational businesses are prepared to basically take down our democratic systems […] If you really look at it: what percentage of the UK actually believe in the United States of Europe, actually believe in this New World Order?

Despite insisting that he has “never been a conspiracy theorist”, this is by no means the first time he has proved otherwise. HOPE not hate recently revealed that Farage has peddled similar conspiracies, including in the online documentary Bilderberg: The Movie, alongside a number of conspiracy theorists from the notorious LaRouche movement. He has also appeared six times on the American far-right conspiracy theory show InfoWars, an organisation to which several prominent Brexit Party figures have links. We have also previously exposed two Brexit Party MEPs and its Dundee West candidate for having appeared on an antisemitic conspiracy radio show.

Farage may have felt confident to let his mask slip a little when talking on Revelation TV, perhaps encouraged by the small audience size and hugely complimentary hosts. For all his jollity and his highly stage-managed PR operation, Farage continues to peddle deeply regressive and dangerous views.

Farage alongside far-right conspiracy theorist Jack Posobiec

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