More National Action members convicted

Last week the total of National Action members imprisoned for membership of the banned group rose again with four members of the group jailed at Birmingham Crown Court.

Including retrials, that’s fifteen court cases since the group was banned by the Home Secretary in December 2016.  

As the BBC pointed out, nine of those cases were for terrorism related offences, and two for sexual offences including children.

Jones with face covered, Newcastle 2015

We have long stated at HOPE not hate, that National Action (NA) is an organisation built on abuse. Whether it be the abuse of women or children mattered not to them.  What is still amazing however, is that the organisation’s sick founders’ still remain at liberty, even though they have been mentioned continuously in every court case and their long, sticky fingers have been further evident in court trials involving other perverted, sick groups influenced by NA.

Indeed, National Action’s co-founder Ben Raymond, a twisted and sick individual, was removed from the Birmingham trial for exhibiting his strange and disruptive behaviour. Unlike those before the court, Raymond was able to go home and continue his weird and disruptive behaviour.

The jailing of Mark Jones is particularly welcome. When I wrote the book ‘Nazi Terrorist’ about National Action, whole swatches had to be omitted in relation to Jones in case it would prejudice his trial. He was without doubt one of the most unapologetically hardline of the group and in our opinion, possibly the most dangerous.

Jones moved himself to West Yorkshire from East London because that is where NA believed their long lusted over ‘race war’ would commence.

Despite his relative youth, Jones has a long pedigree of neo-Nazi activity, having made a name for himself in the youth wing of the British National Party (BNP), where the likes of he and Nazi paeodophile Jack Renshaw cut their teeth.

Raymond: Thrown out of court

Unlike others in NA who veered between childish insolence and sickening perversion, Jones was highly regarded in the ‘wider’ movement for his commitment.  He was also another in the group who preyed on young women who entered their orbit.  At the earlier trial, journalists were witness to his partner, the ‘Miss Hitler’ runner-up Alice Cutter, breaking down in tears when it was revealed just how predatory Jones had been.

Like Renshaw, Jones was instrumental in the infighting that finally brought the curtains down on the BNP in 2014.  Nick Griffin, the former MEP and party leader that the party expelled, even turned to Jones with the idea that Jones and the host of others milling around the periphery of the newish NA should look to groups like the Islamist al Qaeda.

Although Griffin would be later disappointed NA decided against following him and his advice completely, NA most certainly did take some inspiration from Islamist terrorism.  Be it the ideology ‘White Jihad’ which inspired two of their members to commit terrorist acts or the medieval notion that women should and could be enslaved,   the greatest failures in understanding National Action and subsequent like-minded groups has been in not understanding the group was ideologically driven far differently than the alcoholics, pimps and other degenerates that formed the rest of the far-right. That this is now being addressed forensically, is cause for cautious welcome.

A youthful Jones (left) during his time in the BNP

I suppose one footnote that cannot go without a mention is how as the BNP split and descended into civil war, the only way and means the group had of expelling Jones- who had taken to threatening senior figures in the party’s inglorious and self-defeating coup d’état, was noting he had turned up to a party meeting with a packet of peanuts and only drank water.