While the ban against US neo-nazi group The Atomwaffen Division is welcome, the UK government has failed once again to proscribe the dangerous nazi-occult group, the Order of Nine Angles.

Commenting on the impending proscription announced today by the Government against US neo-nazi terror group, The Atomwaffen Division, HOPE not hate’s CEO Nick Lowles said:

“The Atomwaffen Division (AWD) are vile, dangerous nazis who are intent on promoting, and carrying out, acts of terrorism against people they hate, so government moves to finally ban the group are welcome. 

“However, the government’s counter-terrorism strategy against the far-right threat remains deeply troubling. 

“Today’s ban is overdue and comes as the group is past its peak. At the same time, the government has missed an opportunity to take action against the dangerous Order of Nine Angles (O9A), a nazi-occultist group which has been a key influence on the AWD and several other nazi-terror groups. 

“Since we started to warn about O9A’s growing influence, a serving US soldier has been indicted for planning a terror attack with O9A members, and the Canadian government has moved against the group, too. Time is ticking: the Government must take the threat of O9A more seriously and urgently get a ban in place.”

Background

  • Over the last 24 months, eight nazis linked to the O9A (members or in possession of O9A material) have been convicted of terror offences in the UK. Two more trials are pending judgment. The majority of these cases were of young males in their teens, including a 16-year-old in County Durham who was convicted with O9A material in his possession.
  • Evidence suggests that children as young as 13 are being attracted by a desensitising escalator of acts of sexual violence, child abuse and violence.
  • In July 2020, the US Attorney for Southern New York indicted a serving US soldier for attempted murder. It is alleged that he conspired with O9A, giving classified information about his unit’s planned deployment with the intention for the group to attack the unit.
  • In total, 61 far-right activists or sympathisers have been convicted of terror-related offences since the beginning of 2017, with a further 11 awaiting trial.